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2024-25 federal grant information presented to Virginia Beach School Board

The Virginia Beach School Board received information about proposed federal grant applications at its May 14 meeting. For the 2024-25 school year, Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS) would receive approximately $21.1 million in formula grant funds through programs authorized under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA).

School Board of the City of Virginia Beach names Dr. Donald Robertson Jr. superintendent

The School Board of the City of Virginia Beach voted to name Dr. Donald Robertson Jr. as superintendent at its meeting Jan. 23. A native of Hampton Roads, Dr. Robertson began his career as a math teacher with Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS) in 1988 and progressed in leadership roles including assistant principal of Bayside High School, principal of Salem High School, chief strategy and innovation officer, chief schools officer, chief of staff and acting superintendent. 

Logo Virginia Beach City Public Schools Charting the Course

Hundreds of Virginia Beach City Public Schools (VBCPS) students will participate in the 16th Annual African American Male Summit on Jan. 20 at Frank W. Cox High School. Boys in grades six through 12 will share ideas with each other and with adult community members on topics such as student leadership, community involvement, relationship-building, and physical and mental well-being.

Contact Us

Environmental Studies Program

Located at:

Macon and Joan Brock Center Classroom
3663 Marlin Bay Drive
Virginia Beach, VA 23455

 

Environmental Studies Program Hours

School-year Hours


Office: 7:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Morning Session: 7:40 a.m. - 10:10 p.m.
Afternoon Session: 11:05 a.m. - 1:35 p.m.

The Macon and Joan Brock Center, is the first commercial building in the continental U.S. permitted to capture and treat rainfall for use as drinking water.

It is the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's (CBF) Brock Environmental Center in Virginia Beach, and it has achieved one of the toughest building standards in the world—Living Building Challenge certification.

With its solar panels and residential wind turbines producing nearly twice as much energy as the building has used, the Center has far surpassed expectations since its completion in late 2014. Geothermal wells, rain cisterns for drinking water, waterless toilets, and natural landscaping, add to the center's status as an international model for energy- and water-efficiency. Elevated 14 feet above sea level, it is also a prototype for coping with climate change in a region increasingly prone to flooding.

Living Building Challenge certification from the International Living Future Institute requires a building to produce more energy than it uses over the course of 12 consecutive months and meet a host of other strict criteria for water use, location, health, materials, equity, and beauty.

The results have been remarkable. Electrical hook-up fees for the 10,500 square foot building add up to only about $17.19 per month, the minimum fee to tie into the grid. In fact, in the past year the Center has produced about 83 percent more energy than it has used. The building also uses 90 percent less water than a typical office building of its size. And as a result of conservation efforts and innovative technologies, the building uses 80 percent less energy than a typical building that size.

 

Resource: https://www.cbf.org/about-cbf/locations/virginia/facilities/brock-environmental-center/